Samsung’s foldable phone could end up costing over $2,500

Let’s be frank here, we all knew this was coming. Foldable display tech, arguably the biggest smartphone revolution in years finally reaching end-user viable market status was bound to demand a premium. Especially in its first iteration and from a top dog, name-brand the likes of Samsung. Even so, $1925 – $2565 is beyond eye-watering. It is exuberant to say the leas

It is clear that the Samsung Galaxy F/Flex or whatever naming the Korean giant lands on will be a concept device, not really meant for the general consumer. Much like the Note Edge was back in the day when curved was the futuristic trend. That’s probably for the better too, since there were plenty of issues with that device and we can only imagine foldable panel implementations will be an order of magnitudes harder to perfect and really make viable. But, we digress.

Back to the mentioned figures. These come from a fairly reputable source. However, little extra info is offered. The biggest question in our mind is why the two price tags are so far apart. The only thing that springs to mind is at least a couple of models and storage tiers. Potentially size difference, although the foldable design could turn that concept on its head altogether. Apple’s current lineup has the entry-level 64GB iPhone XS at $999 and the top-tier XS Max at a $500 premium, so the variance is not unheard of.

We also can’t help but wonder why the quoted figures are so precise. Dare we even consider the possibility that these are actual production and parts cost calculations and not retail prices? We probably won’t get any sort of additional info prior to the first Flex Display actually hitting the market in at least some shape or form, which is said to happen some time in March 2019. The source of that particular release time frame also mentioned a price of about $1,770 (KRW 2 million in its homeland), while another carrier leak has also previously mentioned a GBP 2,000 figure for the top end model. In any case, no matter which source you decide to trust, you are still looking at prohibitively expensive price points.

[“source=ndtv”]

This is how you make sure your apps only update over WiFi

FOR THE MOST part, updating apps and your phone is important. Not only will you get improvements to your apps and bug fixes, but it can also mean security updates too.

It’s recommended that you update your apps as soon as they arrive, but you only want to do that when you’re connected to WiFi. Some apps, especially games, are large and updates for them can really eat into your data usage.

In certain cases, your phone is automatically set to update apps but if you want to check and make sure mobile data isn’t being used, you can.

On iOS, go into Settings and scroll down to iTunes & App Store. Here you will see some options. The first is automatic downloads which include Music, Apps, Books & Audiobooks and Updates.

Underneath it is the option to use mobile data and if you turn it off, the above will only update on WiFi. If you keep it on, downloads are limited to a file size of 100MB or lower but that can still eat into your data allowance.

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On Android, you need to go into Google Play itself. Swipe out the left-hand menu and go into settings. Here you will see Auto-update apps at the top of the screen. Tapping on it will give you the option to update via WiFi only or do it at any time.

Scrolling further down will show you other options like adding new apps to the home screen automatically or notifications for when updates are available. You can turn these off if you wish to keep your home screen and notifications uncluttered.

[“source=forbes]

BlackBerry sues Facebook over messaging apps (Update)

Canadian telecommunications firm BlackBerry is suing Facebook, accusing the American social media company of infringing on its p
Canadian telecommunications firm BlackBerry is suing Facebook, accusing the American social media company of infringing on its patents for messaging apps

Canadian telecommunications firm BlackBerry sued Facebook on Tuesday, accusing the American social media company of infringing on its patents for messaging apps.

BlackBerry is claiming infringement on patents it holds for message encryption and notifications, and is seeking an injunction as well as damages for lost profits, although no figure was given.

Facebook and its wholly-owned services Instagram and WhatsApp are named as defendants in the lawsuit. The company said it intends to fight the lawsuit.

“We have a lot of respect for Facebook and the value they’ve placed on messaging capabilities, some of which were invented by BlackBerry,” BlackBerry spokeswoman Sarah McKinney said in a statement.

She said BlackBerry would like to partner with Facebook “in our drive toward a securely connected future, and we continue to hold this door open to them.”

“However, we have a strong claim that Facebook has infringed on our intellectual property, and after several years of dialogue, we also have an obligation to our shareholders to pursue appropriate legal remedies,” McKinney added.

Facebook shot back by disparaging BlackBerry, saying the lawsuit “sadly reflects the current state of its messaging business.”

“Having abandoned its efforts to innovate, Blackberry is now looking to tax the innovation of others. We intend to fight,” Facebook deputy general counsel Paul Grewal said.

BlackBerry, after abandoning the manufacture of its once-popular smartphones, which it also pioneered, has refocused its core business on cybersecurity software and services.

[“source=ndtv”]